helping brides create beautiful weddings without breaking the bank

Charming decorations. Fantastic cakes. Elegant hairstyles. Breathtaking venues. In the pre-Internet days, brides pasted magazine clippings in a notebook, consulted library books, and took notes at friends’ weddings for inspiration. Today’s bride has unlimited possibilities because of idea-warehouses like Pinterest. However, it can be overwhelming.

Perhaps you’ll see yourself in one of these five brides.

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Take the Pinterest Personality Quiz below:

 

Crafty Cathy 

She loves do-it-yourself (DIY) ideas and has the talent to match. Her Pinterest profile abounds with beautiful designs, but she won’t be able to do everything she wants to.

Tirzah, an artsy-craftsy newlywed, admits it might have been a little crazy to continue adding ideas from Pinterest to her wedding right up to the last minute. With advice from other brides, she says, “I decided that my future husband, ceremony location, photos, and people were my top priorities.” That mindset changed her planning.

A Crafty Cathy can survive if she asks herself a few questions as she pins ideas. How much time will this project take? How much time do I have? How many friends can help me? How much does it cost? Planning carefully will help you keep your sanity and enjoy the days leading up to your wedding.

 

 

 

Shoestring Sally

Sally has a tiny budget for her wedding and big dreams. She loves the ideas she sees on Pinterest, but she fears that she will have to skimp on style to save cash, and that could mean her wedding might look cheap.

Ashley S. says, “I started planning my wedding just before Pinterest took the world by storm. I knew I was going to be a DIY bride, both out of necessity and out of a lifelong love of the challenge.” She says the extravagant magazine ideas fit for 20,000-dollar budgets depressed her, and she wasn’t able to implement everything she wanted.

From an organizational standpoint, Ashley has advice for the shoestring bride. Have two wedding boards on Pinterest—a massive one for all the brainstorming, and a second one for the narrowed down ideas that you plan to use.

 

 

Not-so-Artsy Nancy

This bride doesn’t enjoy crafts very much. She wants a beautiful wedding, but comparison to craftier brides paralyzes her confidence in her own style and abilities.

Naomi didn’t have a Pinterest account, but her sister did, and their weddings were only three months apart. Her sister relished the creative process of making wedding decorations and Naomi didn’t. Instead, she depended on her sister and other family members for help with her plan.

If you are not-so-artsy, you may have had enough of people telling you what you should do. This is still your wedding. If you want an artistic wedding, you’ll need to build team to get it done. If you don’t want crafty projects to be part of your day, don’t. You’re the boss. Relish the time you get to spend with your groom while other brides glue glitter and ribbon to centerpieces.

 

 

 

Blissful Betty

This wistful gal has planned for her special day since before the engagement took place. Now that it’s official, she can make her hidden Pinterest boards public. She loves the whole process of planning her wedding. She pins dreamy dresses, glamorous locations, and delightful ideas for invitations and decorations, but she hasn’t quite figured out the practical way to make it all happen.

Ashley N. has only five months to plan her wedding, but she started pinning ideas long before she got the ring. She says Pinterest has helped her with ideas, yet she admits that “seeing all of the lavish ideas that other people have used and wishing that it was feasible to have them at my own wedding” makes Pinterest a difficult place to hang out.

If you are a Blissful Betty, it’s time to get serious about what you pin and make your dreams come to life. Go back through those boards you started so long ago to see if they still match your tastes and fit with your overall scheme for the wedding.

 

 

 

Pinaholic Patty

This bride is addicted to pinning wedding ideas. It isn’t a bad thing. She needs help narrowing down thousands of ideas without feeling like she missed out on something on her special day.

For the newly engaged Brooke, Pinterest is her unofficial wedding planner, giving her ideas, timelines, contact information, and more. She isn’t exactly a pinaholic, but she shares something in common with Pinaholic Patty—she finds the possibilities overwhelming. Brooke says Pinterest “often portrays wedding ideas that are beautiful but very unrealistic for my budget and location.” She doesn’t want to settle for what she can afford at the cost of letting go of her expectations.

If you are a feverish pinner, create more than one board and separate ideas by menu, venue, dress, hair, ceremony, reception, photos, honeymoon, invitations, etc. Pin only what you feasibly could use for your wedding. Then, create another board for the overflow. These are ideas that catch your eye, but you are unlikely use. As you get closer to the wedding, move the ideas you aren’t using to the overflow board to keep your plans uncluttered.

 

Whatever your style, celebrate your strengths, and manage your weaknesses and you’ll have a wedding day that reflects you perfectly. You are “pinspiring” just the way you are.

 

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michelle-rayburnMichelle Rayburn is a freelance writer who has consulted for many brides. She’s somewhat of a Pinaholic Patty who has a flair for the artsy craftsy. You can view more of her work at www.michellerayburn.com

 

 

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About Jessica

Jessica is the creator of The Budget Savvy Bride; she launched the site in May of 2008, shortly after becoming engaged. Jessica has been recognized as a budget wedding expert by various media outlets and continues to share realistic inspiration and actionable tips to help brides save money on their weddings. Google

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